On This Day, September 23

Posted on 23rd Sep 2012 by ian under On This Day | No Comments »

In 1122, Pope Calixtus II and Holy Roman Emperor Henry V agreed to the Concordat of Worms. Worms is one of the oldest cities in Germany.  Today the city is an industrial centre and is famed for the original “Liebfrauenstift-Kirchenstück” or Liebfraumilch wine… and danke for that!

In 1846, astronomer Johann Gottfried Galle discovered Neptune… quite a pretty planet, isn’t it?

In 1930, flashbulbs were patented by Johannes Ostermeier…

In 1959, the MS Princess of Tasmania, Australia’s first passenger roll-on/roll-off diesel ferry, made her maiden voyage across Bass Strait. The ship was scrapped at Alang, India in March 2005, after 46 years of service all over the world and 10 other name changes…

In 1962, The Jetsons premiered on ABC-TV. It was the first program on the network to be carried in colour. I still wait patiently for that magic oven that pops out a steak dinner so effortlessly… Come on, sing that theme… “Meet George Jetson…”

In 1964, the new ceiling painting of the Paris Opera house was unveiled. The work was done by Russian-born artist Marc Chagall…

In 1965, lawyer and judge Roma Mitchell became the first female judge in Australia…

In 1973, Juan Perón returned to a third term in Argentina for 9 short months at the end of which, no one cried…

Also in 1973, tens of thousands of small toads rained down in small villages in France. In one village it rained toads for 2 days. Made a nice change from the usual cats and dogs…

In 2008, a large lump of ‘something unpleasant’ and unidentifiable washed up on a New Zealand beach

…Rumours that it could be ambergris, a waxy discharge from the intestinal tract of some species of whales, so valuable in making perfumes that it can sell for thousands of dollars per kilogram had locals rushing to try to cut off chunks to sell. The 500kg foul-smelling, greasy lump was about the size and shape of a 44-gallon drum and was later identified as lumps of tallow or lard. One wonders if the rumors weren’t started by Wellington City council workers who were spared the task of finding a way to remove the first smelly, unsightly object from the beach, eh?

In 1983, Sydney was announced as the venue for the 2000 Olympic Games. In an ironic twist, Sydney was named over Beijing due in part to Australia’s security and political stability. These were to be the last games pre-911 terror attacks. Security at the Olympic Games now is at it’s highest levels ever…

In 2009, a huge dust storm blanketed parts of eastern Australia, leaving my sister in Broken Hill with 10 metres of visibility. Someone more cynical than I may add, that’s more than enough for Broken Hill…

BORN ON THIS DAY

63 BC – Roman Emperor Caesar Augustus…

1215 – Kublai Khan of the Mongol Empire…

1869 – Mary Mallon, better known Typhoid Mary…

1920 – Mickey Rooney, American actor…

1926 – John Coltrane, American saxophonist…

1930 – Ray Charles, American musician…

1939 – Henry Blofeld, English BBC cricket commentator…

Henry Blofeld’s father ,Tom Blofeld, went to Eton with Ian Fleming and his name may have been the inspiration for the name of James Bond supervillain, Ernst Stavro Blofeld.

1944 – Eric Bogle (right), Scottish-Australian singer and songwriter…And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda…(Here’s a brush with fame – Ian once pumped out Eric’s septic tank on Sydney’s Northern Beaches!)

1949 – Bruce Springsteen, American singer-songwriter, also known as The Boss…

1959 – Jason Alexander, American actor also known as George Kostanza

1976 – Sarah Blasko, Australian singer-songwriter and musician Australia’s Katy Perry, both her parents were missionaries…

DIED ON THIS DAY

1846 – John Ainsworth Horrocks, English-born explorer of South Australia was one of the first settlers in the in the Clare Valley.  Horrocks is unfortunately known more for how he died.  He was accidentally shot in a hunting accident. His gun fired after the camel he was using lurched, knocking him and causing the weapon to discharge. His injuries were very substantial and included some teeth being knocked out from the bullet, and he died of gangrene a month later. The camel, who had previously attacked other humans (and a goat), was ‘executed’ at Horrocks’ express wish.  Personally, I’d walk a mile for a Camel…